What is HGH?

HGH is the acronym for Human Growth Hormone. It was discovered about a half century ago, but it wasn’t until sometime in the 1970s that researchers and scientists actually figured out the role of HGH in the body. For those intervening years, HGH remained a mystery compound – though it had been isolated in the human body, it remained a mystery compound.

HGH is a protein compound, produced only in one part of the pituitary gland. Even after researchers knew the basics – that it’s a protein and where the body produced it – there was debate over the role it played in the body. When researchers figured out that HGH had an important part in normal growth, the race was on to figure out what the role is and how it could be used to help those who faced issues with growth.

It’s not a huge step between learning the role of HGH and using it as a therapy for children who weren’t growing at a normal rate. Increasing the amount of HGH for those children who otherwise might not have grown enough to do the things normal adults do – drive a car, for example – became a way to positively impact the lives of those youngsters. But the early days of those treatments were limited by researchers’ ability to successfully reproduce the HGH compound.

At first, HGH was first only available by collecting the HGH compound from the pituitary glands of cadavers. After extraction, the natural human growth hormone had to be processed and injection was the only way to introduce additional HGH into a person who needed it. This type of human growth hormone supplement therapy was expensive, time consuming and limited. Only medical professionals could decide who should undergo HGH therapy, and the known benefits were limited.

One of the first things learned about HGH is that it’s in the body of young children – in abundance. As people aged, the HGH in their body decreased. While that sounds like a natural step in the course of aging, someone soon thought to question whether increasing the amount of HGH in the body would be beneficial also to older people.

HGH isn’t the only compound in the body that decreases as we age. You’ve probably heard of some of the other proteins that are abundant in young people but less abundant as we age. Estrogen, progesterone and testosterone are among those compounds that are sometimes supplemented to help older people feel younger and healthier. The HGH protein compound is similarly beneficial as a dietary supplement.

But why would HGH be beneficial to an adult? After all, most adults are trying to lose weight, not grow, right? Actually, HGH has been found to help other adult issues as well. Anti aging is one of the benefits of HGH in adults. It can also increase energy and improve stamina.

HGH supplements and HGH products are now available as HGH dietary supplements, so that you can take an HGH releaser as part of your daily supplement regimen.

Alcoholism What Should I Know About It?

What is alcoholism?

Alcoholism is a disease that affects the part of the brain that controls your feelings, the way you make decisions, and the way you act. People with alcoholism cannot control how much they drink. What causes alcoholism?

Nobody knows what causes alcoholism. People with parents who have alcoholism have a greater chance of getting the disease. Alcoholism may be related to the things we learn when we are growing up. Alcoholism is not caused by a lack of will power or moral values.

How can I tell if I have alcoholism?

It is not easy to tell if you have alcoholism. You might drink socially at first, but over time the drinking can get out of control. Your family, friends, or doctor might notice it before you do. You might drink to help yourself go to sleep or deal with stress and anxiety. Over time, you need to drink more to feel the same way. As the drinking gets worse, you may have some of the following:

* Stomach ulcers

* Liver disease

* Mood problems, such as depression and irritability

* Trouble sleeping

* Problems with family and friends

* Problems at work.

You might have alcoholism if you have tried to quit drinking but were not able to stop. Alcoholism can make you do things you wouldn’t do if you were sober. Some of these things can hurt other people, even the people you love.

Where can I get help for alcoholism?

Your doctor can help you find the right treatment program. You also can check with your health insurance company. Some insurance plans cover alcohol treatment only at certain places.

If you have been a heavy drinker for a long time, do not stop drinking suddenly. This can lead to serious withdrawal symptoms. What is withdrawal?

When you stop drinking, your body might find it hard with no alcohol. You might have some uncomfortable feelings. That is called withdrawal. You might feel anxious and confused or have trouble sleeping. If you get “the shakes” when you don’t drink, or if you feel like you need to have a drink early in the day, you might need to take medicine when you stop drinking to help with the withdrawal. This is called detoxification (say:dee-tox-uh-fuh-kay-shun, or “detox,” for short).

How can my doctor tell if I need detoxification?

Your doctor will ask you questions to see if you need to take medicine to stop drinking. It is important to be honest with your doctor about how much you drink and the kinds of drugs you take.

Can detoxification be done at home?

Yes, but only with close supervision from your doctor. You will need to have another person at home to help you take your medicine. If you have serious withdrawal symptoms or other medical problems, you might have to go to a hospital for detoxification. Tell your doctor if you had a seizure or got delirious when you tried to stop drinking before.

What happens after detoxification?

Detoxification is not enough to treat alcoholism. You should have counseling before and after detoxification. Counseling will help keep you from drinking again.

What about Alcoholics Anonymous?

Alcoholics Anonymous, or “A.A.,” is a free support group for people with alcoholism. The people in A.A. help each other stay sober. Most communities have A.A. meetings, and most alcohol treatment programs tell their patients to go to these meetings.

Where can I get more information?

Your doctor

This information provides a general overview and may not apply to everyone. Talk to your family doctor to find out if this information applies to you and to get more information on this subject.

Mental Health: Knowing When To Get Help

Some people can get so depressed or problematic that they even reach a point where they question their own sanity. Many people actually wonder if they have really gone over the edge.

How about you? Try to answer these questions:

Do you have feelings of sadness or irritability? Has there been a loss of interest in pleasurable activities that you once enjoyed? Have you noticed any weight loss or change in your appetite? Have you noticed changes in your sleeping pattern? Are you feeling guilty? Are you experiencing difficulty in concentrating, remembering things or making decisions? Have you had thoughts of suicide or death? If you answered yes to most of these questions, consider consulting your family physician as your mental health maybe at risk.

Mental health, as defined by the Surgeon General’s Report on Mental Health, refers to the successful performance of mental function, resulting in productive activities, fulfilling relationships with other people, and the ability to adapt to change and cope with adversity. On the other end of the flow is mental illness, a term that refers to all mental disorders.

Mental disorders are health conditions that are characterized by alterations in thinking, mood, or behavior associated with distress or impaired functioning. This notion of a continuum sees mental health on one end as successful mental functioning compared to mental illness on the other end as impaired functioning.

Mental health is how we think, feel, and act as we cope with life. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices. Like physical health, mental health is important at every stage of life, from childhood and adolescence through adulthood.

Everyone feels worried, anxious, sad or stressed sometimes. But with a mental illness, these feelings do not go away and are severe enough to interfere with daily life. It can make it hard to meet and keep friends, hold a job, or enjoy life.

Mental illnesses are quite common and affect about one in five families in the U.S. These disorders such as depression, phobias, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and many others are real diseases that one cannot get away from. Fortunately, they are often treatable. Medicines and therapy can improve the life of most people with mental illnesses. But, it is more cost-effective to have a physician prescribe mood stabilizers instead of seeing a psychiatrist. However, follow doctor’s instructions on counseling and referrals to mental health professionals.

People who are emotionally and mentally healthy are in control of their thoughts, feelings and behaviors. They feel good about themselves and have good relationships. They can keep problems in perspective. It’s important to remember that people who have good emotional health sometimes have emotional problems or mental illness. Mental illness often has a physical cause, such as a chemical imbalance in the brain. Stress and problems with family, work, or school can sometimes trigger mental illness or make it worse. If you feel that you or someone you care about is at risk, ask for help, it may not be easy at first, but there are ways and steps that may save your own or someone elses life.